Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Testing, testing Photoshop Essentials, lesson 2 with Kim Klassen, 178-180/365



Part of today's lesson (actually last  Friday's, but I am finally getting around to it!) is about resizing and saving them for printing and web format  The very top photo was done at 600 pixels wide and the two below at 800 pixels wide.  Do you see a difference?  Above, the second one is from my SD chip, no resizing.  It the top image a bit sharper?

Can anyone explain why this is an important step as I don't see much difference... (note:  Thanks for answering - I guess it has to do more with printing out the images and if you view in a larger format.  And a smalle pixel size saves memory.)



Daffodils are wonderful and I love this first burst of spring color!  Spring is finally here!

Now I am off to learn about the Adjustment Panel in Photoshop.  I will be posting the experiments to my blog tomorrow.  This class makes learning this program so enjoyable in the least amount of time.  I have wasted SO much time trying to figure the basics out from my "how to" books.

11 comments:

Patty Ann said...

Love the pictures. Can't help you a lot with the pixels, I think it has to do with how much memory it takes to print them. Some computer programs, (web sites) can only post pictures that are a certain amount of pixels. The more pixels, the clearer the image and the more memory it uses. So it helps to know how to decrease them.

texwisgirl said...

I don't really see a difference to my untrained eye. And I agree with the comment above - depending on folks' web connection speed, it takes a lot longer for them to be able to load a photo at a higher pixel setting than a lower one.

Bonnie said...

I'm a newcomer to all of this too, but as said above the more pixels the clearer the image but the larger it is. Many web browsers have limits to the size of images they will convey. You want lots of pixels for printing, but generally you don't need to take up so much memory with so many pixels if you are just sending something to a friend by e-mail, or even posting to the web. E.g. Your first pics posted are sharper because they have more pixels per inch, but for the untrained eye it is negligible and your second pics are adequate for posting to your blog.

The prints you offer for others to download should have the most pixels possible - not the reduced number for the web. (If you were posting your best work to your own gallery of work on the web, you would want to use high resolution images.)

Eric 'Bubba' Alder said...

Usually the inherent sharpness of greater resolution doesn't come across unless one is posting the image in a large size.

Sometimes you'd only notice the difference if the image filled your monitor.

Good tips!

Margaret said...

Patty Ann, Texwisgirl, Bonnie & Eric! Thanks. I just started the "textutes" part and have to quite. Kids coming home from school and I have a boatload of laundry to quickly do. This is really fun, though and I have SO much to learn. Thanks again for the advice and tips!! :)

Carol Blackburn said...

Margaret, all I know is that you take a photo with more pixels if you intend to enlarge it to 11x14 or more. I don't think it makes much difference looking at a photo in the smaller size but if you enlarge a photo say taken with 8 instead of 12 megapixels it will be blurry when enlarged. And, yes it does use more space on your computer to store more megapixels. These are awesome!

Rosie said...

Such wonderful signs of spring - I love them, too! As to the save for web - I think that Kim explained it somehow as a possibility to make uploading easier and with that special saving for web it is sharper than just decreasing the pixels (if that's helpful at all now for you...!)

Brian Miller said...

wow...gorgeous shots...perfect for the dawn of spring...wish i was not photographically challenged....

Margaret said...

Carol and Rosie. It is starting to sink in! Thanks.

Brian - your words paint beautiful pictures! :)

forgetmenot said...

Lovely. You just can't go wrong photographing daffodils or any other spring flower for that matter. It is so much easier to have someone show you how to do something than to read about it and try to "figure it out". Mickie :)

Margaret said...

Well, Photoshop is tricky because there is SO much to remember. Kim Klassen makes it much easier, though!