Saturday, July 23, 2016

"Queen Bee"


Coneflower & Honeybee
Queen Bee

From tears of Ra
the bee descends, of sun, of royalty.
As a child, I'd run in fear of the sting,
unaware nectar its sole pursuit -
Cupid learned "Beware love's sting!"
Yet life absorbs such piques, does it not?

Spend many an evening walking husband's perennial gardens 
camera poised, patiently wait for droning honeybee; 
stories of imminent demise foreshadowed -
thrilled when sometimes (only) one shows up...
Does this mean Greek goddesses are nearly forgotten,
the Hindu God of peace is dying, Ra's wisdom silenced?   

This symbol of motherhood and fertility
has walked with me hand in hand; no longer run I from the sting,
but embrace sacrifices, savor long days,
taste sweet nectar of childish arms about my neck; sticky fingers and all.
And occasionally at end of day, raise my glass to the Queen Bee;
realize I'm not just a worker bee.

by Margaret Bednar, July 23, 2016

This is for "Imaginary Garden with Real Toads - Transforming with Nature's Wonders" & "Play it Again, Toads".  I was late in playing, so this is my contribution to an obviously very recent "archived" challenge .

When my husband and I first started dating, somehow I gained the title "Queen Bee".   One of my favorite gifts is a necklace of a honeybee.

You are invited to listen: https://soundcloud.com/margaretbednar/audio-recording-on-saturday









11 comments:

Magaly Guerrero said...

It's always a great idea to remember to raise that glass, when we realize we are so much more.

I bet the necklace is beautiful.

gillena cox said...

Cheers to you and self realisation

Much love...

piano warm said...

I love this section:
"no longer run I from the sting,
but embrace sacrifices, savor long days,
taste sweet nectar of childish arms"

Rosemary Nissen-Wade said...

A wonderful, deep and thoughtful piece.

Rommy said...

I like the contrast of between the lofty realm of the ancient gods and the everyday cares and joys of the protagonist.

Kerry O'Connor said...

I really enjoyed how you wove the cultural significance of the bee with personal experience.

kaykuala said...

raise my glass to the Queen Bee;
realize I'm not just a worker bee

How nice, Marge, to be given pride of place befitting of a regal stature.


Hank

Hannah said...

I agree with Kerry about the cultural significance....you really brought your own experience out beautifully and the background made the poem feel deep and luxurious. I love the "sticky fingers and all" there's nothing like the nectar of a child's love.

Thank you, so much for writing, Margaret. :)

Helen said...

All hail the Queen!!

Jim said...

A Queen Bee with sticky fingers, Honey Bee Supreme.
Love your imagination, Margaret.
..

Stacie Eirich said...

Really love these lines: "no longer run I from the sting,
but embrace sacrifices, savor long days,
taste sweet nectar of childish arms about my neck; sticky fingers and all."

As a mother, every fiber of my being relates to this. To the long summer days...soon to come to an end. The arms, the sticky fingers. This is my present tense.

A couple nights ago I watched a short clip from a BBC nature program about honeybees, the way they create their hives in hexagonal shapes. Fascinating -- your poem brought me back to it. Here's the link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kxDEcODUEP0&list=PL5A4nPQbUF8Djx2pIKIMpK2gaIkns4YXA&index=14

Thanks for sharing!