Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Haibun - An Island's Secrets


Ocracoke has secrets.  For those who have time, she may unveil herself slowly while her tide plays with the moon and her sun rises with an avian chorus.  She never expects a routine.  The Algonkin Indians fished and gathered; pirates Vane, Rackham, and Teach rationed, recovered, and rested; a fishing village sprouted.  Now, as then, the estuaries, salt marshes, and grasslands quietly speak, soothe.  Broad-leaved evergreen trees once canopied large swaths, now cool a few paths, share roots with the Tidal Red Cedar and Live Oaks; gnarled, ancient silhouettes that still rest against a horizon far-flung.  My favorite shrub is the Magnolia Virginiana or sweet-bay (some say swamp-bay but that negates the romance).   Ocracoke’s voice today is slowly being eroded by nature, more quickly by man.  Some say one mad hurricane will sweep all away.  Until then, I'll kayak past Teach’s Hole, bask in loblolly pine's leaning shade, walk white-sand beaches wind-swept clean and crisp, tilt my ear for incoming breeze upon heated neck and perhaps capture a few of her blue trembling secrets before my footprints wash away.

Horizon and dune cradle a blue trembling(s)
promise to cleanse secrets and souls


by Margaret Bednar, April 12, 2016


You are Invited to Listen:  https://soundcloud.com/margaret-elizabeth-bednar/haibun-an-islands-secrets


My attempt to fulfill the requirements for "dVerse - Haibun #11" - Reach Out"  \

Also linked up with "Imaginary Garden with Real Toads - The Tuesday Platform"

20 comments:

writinginnorthnorfolk.com said...

I love being transported to places I know I will never go. I also love the similarities between distant spots on the planet. Your description reminds me of some of the landscape I know here in England: 'Now, as then, the estuaries, salt marshes, and grasslands quietly speak, soothe.' And then it continues into the unknown again: 'Broad-leaved evergreen trees once canopied large swaths, now cool a few paths, share roots with the Tidal Red Cedar and Live Oaks; gnarled, ancient silhouettes that still rest against a horizon far-flung.' Thank you for the journey!

brudberg said...

This is so lovely.. the way the nature communicates with you.. tell you stories and transport you in time... I would love to kayak in an area so serene and quiet, and feel saddened that it might be gone one day due to humans... we need more with light feet that tread carefully.

Sumana Roy said...

beautiful tinged with sadness...it is sad such a pristine place is also not spared from human hands...

lillianthehomepoet.wordpress.com said...

I have been to Ocracoke, many years ago. We took our children there. It was such a beautiful and calm place. We stayed just three nights -- but loved the slowed down pace, the lack of neon lights, and the stars as well as the shores. One night there was a storm and the lights on the island went out...everywhere. It was a magical place. Like so many of these towns/places, I suspect that time has added much commercialism and that it takes a few more steps to reach its true beauty. Thank you for taking me back there. Reminds me of my children's youth and that special time of vacationing as a family of four.

Mary said...

A beautiful haibun, Margaret. You have given us a good picture of Ocracoke, and I feel your love for this place. Sad about the erosion taking place there, as everywhere. We definitely need to take time to enjoy and savor the beauty of these places.

Toni Spencer said...

Oh! You have written about Oracoke which toally makes this NC girl smile. We always summered farther south around Atlantic Beach and Salter Path. Once in awhile we would venture north to OBX and expand our ocean pleasures. I love how you write about this beautiful place and your love of it is communicated so clearly. At least it is not washing away at the horrendous rate of beaches up north. Duke university did a wonderful study years ago of the life cycle of dunes which has helped the NC coast. More work to preserve still needs to be done. I remember when that area was almost deserted. Thank you s much for responding to this prompt with your magical haibun.

Grace said...

I have not been there so this was marvelous to read ~ I like the use of the island's voice and hearing her secrets ~

I love your response Margaret ~ Thanks for joining us ~

Glenn Buttkus said...

A magical haibun indeed; a place I've never been to has spoken to me, posed for me, shared its secrets, echoed its past. The lovely pirate references, especially to Vane & Teach remind me of the superb pirate series on Starz, BLACK SAILS. I adored listening to your recitation; as you know I favor such things.

Debi Swim said...

Beautiful and serene.

liv2write2day said...

I'm always so happy to run across your work, Margaret. There is a lovely serenity in this--a bit meditative and a wee geography lesson.

Sherry Blue Sky said...

This is very beautiful. And what an ancient and beautiful spot.

Linda C. Folks said...

You have painted a beautiful picture of this place, I would love to visit and be able to see and feel its nature as you have,

De said...

This is just so incredibly beautiful:
"perhaps capture a few of her blue trembling secrets before my footprints wash away."

Susie Clevenger said...

Thank you for taking me there. I will probably never see it, but your words allowed me to walk among its secrets.

Rosemary Nissen-Wade said...

Ocracoke was mentioned in an historical novel I was reading today! What serendipity that you have now given me beautiful descriptions of it in words and image.

Kerry O'Connor said...

You convey a deep sense of rejuvenation in these lines.

Laura said...

So beautiful Margaret, full of grace, gratitude and hints of sadness for the loss that is actively coming.

R.K. Garon said...

Nice place for our hearts.
Zq

kaykuala said...

A beautiful place but one can't help knowing humans are the silent force to cause the damage. It is a similar story in many other places too! Great narration Marge!

Hank

mishunderstood said...

The eco-system is so delicate and it's hard to watch such a wondrous piece of nature slowly dissolve. There is a similar place in my area, a cliff hanging over a lake where many would venture to photograph hawks. A large piece collapsed and now the area is unsafe to set foot on. Your haibun is a loving tribute to nature.