Thursday, August 7, 2014

"Kingfisher"


Kingfisher

Tail feathers, crest
were first to go.
Then the eyes -

tongue preserved.

Division of parts, bleached,
dried, reassembled, glued,
buffed, lacquered -

bones in repose.

Upon willow branch
stately solitude and secret
intact.

Margaret Bednar, August 7, 2014



Last week I visited Washington D.C. and enjoyed many museums and art galleries - one of them was the Museum of Natural History's "Bones & Mummies" exhibit.  I was entranced with the numerous animal skeletons - how each was displayed in a natural pose - I wouldn't have been surprised to see them just walk, swim, or fly away!

I am hosting a challenge Friday (August 8th) at "Imaginary Garden of Real Toads - Skeleton Poetry" - sharing a few of my photographs from the exhibit as inspiration.  It starts 12:00 am Friday (central daylight time) and ends Saturday at 12:00 pm.   You are welcome to join in the fun.

This is also linked with dVerse Poets Pub - Meeting the Bar - Lets LIMBO… simple expressions, in 40 words or less.

The skeleton above is of a Ringed Kingfisher - I just love their tilted heads -  as if they have a secret.  They are birds that prefer solitude - pair up only during the mating season to take care of the babies.

18 comments:

Anthony Desmond said...

Ringed Kingfisher... wow, what a beauty; I've never heard of, or seen that bird before... thanks for this

Brian Miller said...

its pretty cool how they preserve life in such a natural pose...and yet, allow us to see the structure that holds it all together as well

Bodhirose said...

I too am fascinated by the skeletons of animals. We have Kingfishers here in Florida...not sure what kind but they make a charming little call as they fly...fast!

Mary said...

Such a beautiful bird! Such a beautiful poem!

Jeanne said...

Fascinating skeleton and love the poem!

Grace said...

Interesting perspective & challenge on skeleton poetry Margaret ~ I never thought of tongues being preserved ~

quest4peas said...

Very cool! Although I think the kingfisher looks much nicer with its feathers on :-)

Claudia said...

very cool to be able to look at something we usually don't see... when i was in oxford a few weeks ago, they had some cool dinosaur skeletons on display

Björn Rudberg said...

Somehow my eyes fill in the gap and I see the bird growing out to become a kingfisher.. those flying gems

Gabriella said...

Interesting display. Birds are magnificent animals.

vbholmes said...

Fascinating to see the contrast between the solid bulk of the head and beak and the fragile bones of the body. Interesting write as well as photo.

Kerry O'Connor said...

This particular little skeleton seems particularly incomplete without its flesh, and oddly unbalanced. I'd also rather see the live version on its willow branch.

Sumana Roy said...

Kingfishers in our place look a bit different...this one's exquisite.... wonderfully expressed

Anders Woje Ellingsen said...

That is certainly not the way I will be remembered! *smile* But the word "preserving" means different things to different people.

That bird is exotic to me. But we have beatiful birds in Scandinavia, too, though not that colourful.

Glenn Buttkus said...

Always fascinating to see the delicacy of bones on birds, nature's way of streamlining them for flight. A poem that stands proudly on its own, regardless of the word restriction; very nice moments.

kaykuala said...

They would do it with such finesse to make them presentable. But realistically it is difficult to identify specific types. Nicely Margaret!

Hank

sreeja harikrishnan said...

very interesting.......last lines are so perfect....

Debi Swim said...

It has always fascinated me that people take the bare bones and rig an animal with skin, hair, colors... I wonder if the dinosaurs really looked the way they are presented.
Anyway, I like the bones of your poem!