Tuesday, June 11, 2013

dVerse Open Link Night #100!! "Letting Go"



Letting Go

Yesterday and tomorrow
are acquainted with today,

where youth,
feet firmly planted,
watches destiny surge forward,
apathetic of bygone days,

while I watch yesterday's ripples
interplay about my feet,
realize how unpredictable,
dreams can be.

My hand grasps her wrist,
warns of my fear,
but she,
entranced with the dawn,
resists the connection,

and I, as all mothers must,
embrace sunset's splendor,
and let go.

by Margaret Bednar originally written 12-30-2012 (updated slightly 6-11-2013)



This is linked today to "dVerse's 100th Open Link Night".  Two years of opening the doors for poets to share work - to read and learn.  Hooray!

24 comments:

TexWisGirl said...

the shot is dreamy. :)

Grace said...

We welcome all kinds Margaret, old and new ~ That shot is great and I know what it feels about letting go ~ But you know what, they come back and perhaps more appreciative of you than ever ~

Great to see you Margaret ~

kaykuala said...

It's certainly not easy! Letting go tugs at the conscience and uncertainties abound. But we have to in time. Wonderful take Marge! And great pics!

Hank

Mary said...

So true that yesterday and tomorrow are acquainted with today. Letting go is not easy, but they do return again....because they WANT to; and that is a good feeling.

Audrey Howitt aka Divalounger said...

They go and they come-and each time they do, they take a piece of your heart with them as you watch them go--at least that is how it is for me--this piece just resonates with me--thank you!

Brian Miller said...

and you gotta know she will return...smiles....but there comes a time we have to let go of them and let them create their life....i feel for you though margaret...smiles.

Ginny Brannan said...

This is just stunning, Margaret! As moms we know we must let them go and embrace the dawn. Easier said than done! Great use of metaphor in this. Both words and images in this piece are breathtaking. Well penned, my friend!

aprille said...

One woman's dawn and another's sunset. Elegantly set out and you managed to disguise the sadness.

Akila G said...

i loved the opening lines and well, we do have to let them go, fly, make a world of their own. Loved the subtlety of this piece

Poet Laundry said...

I have been crying all week...my eldest son will graduate from high school on Saturday...and your poem brought fresh tears again. sigh...

lovely photo too!

Björn said...

What a beautiful piece and homage of letting go... and lovely photographs. Really very nice :-)

James Rainsford said...

Evocative and full of authentic emotion. All who have children can relate to what's expressed here. A true and sensitive write.

TALON said...

As I Mom, I can really relate to this, Margaret. The letting go...oh, but that's definitely the hard part. This was beautiful.

Ginnie said...

Such sweet sorrow! Yes, most of us are acquainted with it. Beautifully written, Margaret.

Mr. Charleston said...

I've always been a person who lives in the future so watching destiny surge forward has always been rather exciting but suddenly, what lies ahead is terrifying. Or is it just that I'm growing older and there is now much more to see behind me than ahead?

kelvin s.m. said...

...letting go was such a long process but once succeeded letting go could never mean the same again but rather a good recollection of how you triumphed life for that new wonderful hellos offered before you... smiles...

hedgewitch said...

Hard to let go, to let them fly when the wind is so treacherous and the water is so deep--yet they find their way. Lovely imagery in this Margaret.

girlwiththepen1118 said...

But isn't it satisfying to know you've been so privileged!

sreeja harikrishnan said...

beautiful! So true...great opening...

rumoursofrhyme said...

Dreams can be so fragile, and chasing them so exciting. I, too, loved the opening.

johnallenrichter said...

Just beautiful emotion Margaret. There has been nothing more emotional in my life than all of the second guessing, efforts, and sacrificing that was done in order to prepare my children for what I felt was important. Even today I think I failed in certain ways, and those thoughts haunt me. Was I too wrapped in work, did I not show enough caring, loving, emotional shoulder for them to have and cry or laugh upon when they needed it? Above all, did I teach them how to love - themselves, God, and others? There came a point when for sanity's sake I realized that I had to let go, I had to accept the understanding that I had done the very best I could and now it is up to them to pick up that ball and carry it across their own goal line. And so..... just a spectator now, in the stands, and cheering whenever I can..... great emotion here poet.....

johnallenrichter said...

Excuse me Margaret, I'm just catching up on Tuesday's openLink night readings... I'm a slow reader and have been very busy this week. I saw your comment on Hank's blog about the AF museum in Dayton Oh... I grew up very near there and accompanied my father, a WWII vet to the museum when I was only five years old. He was a map-maker in the Army - cartogropher to be correct - and had told me many stories about the islands he had visited, mapped, and flew to in order to deliver the maps to the invading generals. He had told me many stories about the B17's he rode on and that his outfit used to take special aerial photos of the islands, and even Japan itself, in order to make maps from them. As a 5 year old just 2- years after the end of the war I was absolutely thrilled to walk through that B17 in the museum. I also got to see actual film footage of dogfights with Japanese Zero's - from camera's mounted on our Mustangs - and from that moment on I was absolutely captured by the grit and emotion of war. Now I have a son who is based in an AFB in Pensacola, which has the best AF museum I have ever seen. It is absolutely wonderful. I just wanted to suggest that you travel there yourself. They have just about every machine ever built and used in flight for the US military and more. I was able to actually place my hand on a German Messerschmidt that had been converted into one of the first military jets ever produced just shortly before the end of the European war.... Such a wonderful piece of history.....

hyperCRYPTICal said...

I can relate to this - letting go is so difficult...
Anna :o]

Vanessa V Kilmer said...

Lovely but that letting go is very hard.