Sunday, September 9, 2012

IGWRT's Sunday Challenge - Around the World, "Overload"


Overload

Tucked away amongst tombs
and palaces, I wander,
become "one"
with exotic and frenetic.

Inhale lentil soup,
sesame-covered peanuts,
dried apricots, piled nine feet high,
figs, snails, pumpkin seeds, and dates,

splashing fountains,
citrus trees, mosaics,
fetid disguised with sprigs of mint.

Resist goat head, brains,
and snake charming vendors
from stall number seven,

dodge overloaded donkey carts,
duck into labyrinths
of textiles, herbs, metal works,
silk and leather.

Brand my skin with henna
as musical notes ride
swirling dust.

Follow the scent of warm
flatbread and honey,
fresh squeezed juice of orange,

and loose myself
in filtered light,
unnavigable souks,

dead-ending
in spicy reds, golds, browns,
rustic oranges, tropical greens,
pulsating blues.

Unmindful
if I ever find my way back.


by Margaret Bednar, Art Happens 365, September 9, 2012

This is for Imaginary Garden with Real Toads - Sunday Challenge "Around the World".   HERE is a blogpost that has a few photos of a real Moroccan market.  And if you really want an in-depth overload, here is a site entitled "Images of Daily Life in Morocco"










17 comments:

Kerry O'Connor said...

I have a picture of myself at 20 sitting on the edge of that fountain in the first photo! I can tell that these pics brought back some wonderful memories for you, for me too. I love how you captured the clash of the senses in the Moroccan Marketplace.

Thank you for this challenge, Margaret.

De said...

This is absolutely beautiful. I took the journey with you. All of your photos are gorgeous, but that first one just caught my heart. I'm so blessed to have written to it. Thank you!

de
whimsygizmo.wordpress.com

Green Speck said...

Amazing pictures. Loved the shots and the poem :-)

Grace said...

Such lovely and stunning pictures ~

I like how you captured the tastes, smell and images of unique and different cultural colors ~

I would get an overload of these spicy hues too ~

hedgewitch said...

You walk us through these colors and smells, and it's almost like being there-lots of really vivid language and descriptions make this a wonderful travelogue, with just a hint of something more profound, a statement about how life can be lived differently. I really liked this photo, also--but you know how my mind works--my poem was going to be about baskets spilling colorful entrails. ;_) No, just kidding. It reminded me of punk hair dye, actually.

Peggy said...

Lovely images in photos and poetry Margaret. I have loved getting lost in the labyrinth of the markets.

Fireblossom said...

Girl, you captured it! All the sights, sounds and smells of the marketplace. And the photographs are breathtaking.

Mama Zen said...

This is just splendid, Margaret!

Margaret said...

Thank you, everyone!

Kerry - I'd love to see that photo of yesteryear :)

Joy... punk hair dye! colorful entrails You have an imagination that rocks!

RMP said...

beautiful pictures. I can see how easy it would be to get lost in such magic.

Kay L. Davies said...

Oh, yes, Margaret, your words are the perfect complement to your photo, taking me back to our visit to Morocco. Your word-pictures are so perfect "dried apricots piled nine feet high" and "fetid disguised with sprigs of mint" made me smile.
K

Susie Clevenger said...

A beautiful sensory walk through Moroccan market.

Jinksy said...

Full of Eastern spices, your poem! :)

Susan said...

Yes, from title through the end, I love this poem. It takes me there, even thought there is no pink in it! And the pictures and links you give are gorgeous too. I love the carpets that take up a quarter of a stadium. In this poem I notice how food entices throughout all the exhibits.

Mary Mansfield said...

Love this Margaret...I can just feel that riot of sights, smells, and sounds assaulting my senses.

Helen said...

A mere few lines into this lush descriptive poem and I knew exactly where you and I were. And the PHOTOS? Wow!

Ginnie said...

Talk about a visual delight. I would have been "short of eyes" there!